Flash Back, Flash Forward, Flash Sideways? — Abec 11 Flashback Review

Flash Back, Flash Forward, Flash Sideways? — Abec 11 Flashback Review

Hello Public,

I have been taking the past few weeks to work on some wheel reviews and it has been awesome. The first wheel I want to review is a classic among freeriders… the Abec 11 Flashback. Now Flashies (as they have been lovingly nicknamed) have generated a sort of cult of followers over the years and I was curious how they would feel as I actually reviewed them. However, per usual, before we get into how they handle on the pavement let’s talk about the technical specifications.

Flashbacks are 70mm wheels with a 43mm contact path. Abec 11 says that Flashies have square lips and they do have a definite angle to them, but I would say they are ever so slightly less than square. They come in a wide range of durometers from 75a all the way to 84a, so really soft or a little harder, pick your pleasure. Finally they have a sideset bearing hub so they aren’t meant to be flipped backwards (although I did put that to the test too).

Like all the wheels I test I put Flashbacks through the motions in most major disciplines of riding…

Commuting
Flashbacks actually make a pretty nice wheel to ride around town. If you’re looking for a chill glide around town with wheels that absorb vibrations and bumps grab a set of the softer Flashies and you will be golden. If you are more of an agressive commuter you bump the durometer up a notch or so to make kicking out slides a little easier.

Downhill
Flashbacks are not intended to be a downhill wheel but they do have a few admirable qualities for going fast. The first is that if you are on shorter runs being a 70mm wheels allows them to accelerate faster than a larger, say 75mm, wheel would which means you get up to your top speed faster. The other nice thing for downhilling is that you can drift super predictably on Flashies, however the downside of that nice drift is that they don’t have very much grip. If you are running a softer durometer with the mold release still on you should be fine taking most turns but trying to take something sharp while going fast may result in you sliding out.

Freestyle
As far as freestyling goes Flashies have got you covered. They aren’t too heavy but they are big enough to give you some nice roll from one push. This is great for trying to linking up tricks or board dancing. Another interesting freestyle trait of Flashbacks is that have a nice range of hardnesses, so you can go with the really soft or a little harder based on your preference.  I feel like with these wheels you can really take your freestyle from the parks to the streets and be equally at home.

Freeride
This is it for Flashies. I learned why they have such a huge fanbase when I started to freeride them really hard. The set I reviewed were 78a in durometer so they were pretty soft and also pretty dope. Flashbacks has a super smooth slide. They are the definition of what you might call a buttery slide. Since my wheels were a little softer they took a little more effort to kick out into a slide than a harder wheel might but once you break the wheels free they just glide. In addition they drop super thane if you hold your slide out for long enough. Some people don’t like seeing thane and some do, but regardless its always kind of cool seeing some lines left on the run you just took as you’re walking back up the hill. My Flashies have also worn very well don’t have any flatspots or ovaling which is always something to look for in a good freeride wheel.

Alright well, even though I have been loving Flashies to death (literally almost to the death of the wheels) every wheel has its trade offs. Dropping those cool thane lines on the ground means you are leaving your wheel on the ground when you slide so Flashbacks are not the most durable wheel on the market. However, coming in at a cool $36.00 a set they are also one of the cheapest wheels out there, so replacing them doesn’t cost you an arm and a leg.

If you are looking for a wheel that is ready to hit the hills and go super sideways then I wouldn’t look any further than Flashbacks. Any dedicated freerider knows that he/she is going to need to replace they wheels they burn through in a few sessions and Flashies are probably the best bargain out there. I have loved my Flashback and will continue to love them to the core. If you ever get a chance pick up a set and try them out for yourself!

Any questions, comments, concerns, cooking recipes, parables????
Send them my way!

Special Thanks to Tyler and Alex for appearing in these photos!

Stay Awesome,
Wayne

Current Favorite Setup:
-Loaded Dervish Sama
-Paris 180mm Trucks
-Orangatang Nipples (Purple)
-Bones Redz
-ABEC 11 FLASHBACKS 78a

All Hot and Bothered — Fireball Incendo and Beast Wheels Review

All Hot and Bothered — Fireball Incendo and Beast Wheels Review

Hey My Friends,
I have been checking out some new wheels lately have been rocking these sick new sets of Fireball wheels the Incendos and Beasts. These wheels are pretty interesting wheels in that preform well in a variety of skating styles and look good to boot. They have a really nice urethane formula that begs to be slid on and are a fun all around skate wheel. Let’s get into the specifications of these wheels.

   All Fireball wheels come in 3 signature color/durometer combination with the softest being the white 81a, followed by the red 84a, and finally the black 87a. They also all come slide prepped with a nice stone ground surface so you can slide these bad boys on day one. They have an interesting lip shape, but I’ll talk more about that in a second. There are two varieties of Fireball wheels the Incendos and Beasts. Incendos are offset and 70mm with a 44mm contact path and Beasts are offset 76mm wheels with a 49mm contact path.

I mentioned that these wheels can perform well in many of the different situations a rider might encounter on the road which makes sense because Incendos were designed to be an all around wheel. Unfortunately I have heard some guys who like to hold those long standies out for days complain about Fireballs. Well when I was talking with some of the crew over at Fireball they informed that these wheels weren’t meant to freeride specific. However, they told me that may have something along those lines in the works so all you guys who only like to hold out standies can look forward to those, because although these wheels aren’t the best shape for freeride the thane formula is soooooo smooth. But I digress, let me tell how these wheels perform in the many different styles of riding you might want to put them through.

Commuting
I really enjoy commuting on both Incendos and Beasts for different reasons. If you like to whip some check slides and do flip tricks on your commute you are going to love the Incendos they are lighter and accelerate nice and quickly. If you like the whole push, push coast dealio then you are going to dig the Beasts. They take a little bit of work to get up to speed since they are larger but they hold speed great. It’s really nice for longer commutes and skater who aren’t into flippy tricks or doing quick slides.

Freestyle
If you are into freestyle longboarding then you are probably going to prefer the Incendos. They are light, nimble, and break out into quick little slides like it is their job. I really like these wheels for longboard flip tricks and flatland powerslides when I am freestyling. They leave thane so easy, it’s kinda cool, you can see your thane lines after quick 180s. The best freestyle application for the Beasts that I have found are that they are dope for dancing. That nice long coast I was talking about means that you can cross-step the day away without having to put your feet back down for pushing. Oh yeah!

Downhill
Now this is a discipline that these wheels were made for! Incendos are great for hitting hills that aren’t super long and that you are going to need to get up to your top speed quickly due to their smaller 70mm diameter. Beasts are, well… they are beastly at downhill. They have great top speed and hold that speed very well. That 76mm diameter, as I mentioned, makes them great for sustaining speed and the wide contact path allows them to corner pretty well too. Both Incendos and Beasts come with a stone ground finish so I would not recommend trying to grip through a hard corner going super fast, because you’re going to slide. Now, I am not a downhill racer, but I have taken both sets of wheels through some tight turns going fast and they drift beautifully! This is where I think that these wheels really excel over the competition, they are so freaking smooth and predictable!

Freeride
I touched on this earlier in my review, but what is interesting about Beasts and Incendos are that they are not meant to be a freeride specific wheel. Despite this, what is great about these wheels is that they are both awesome to freeride anyways. I really enjoyed the urethane formula of the wheels because it is smooth as hell. These wheels are not the very best wheels I have ridden to hold out loooong standing slides, but they are definitely aren’t the worst and I would still say that you should give them a try. What is really interesting is that they are super sick for 180 slides. I will 180 down a hill all day long on these wheels and enjoy every second of it.

So would I recommend Fireball brand wheels to a friend?
Absolutely I would!

I would recommend the Incendos to anyone looking for a nice all around wheel that can really hold its own in all types of riding. I ride my Incendos on my every day do-anything board and they are a perfect fit. I can meet my friends on the hills, to freestyle, or just to cruise around and be confident in my wheels meeting my requirements.

I would recommend the Beasts to someone looking for a wheel that hold speed nicely and drift well. If you live in an area where you need to hit some speed and then take a drifty corner, check out some Beasts. Additionally if you are a strict commuter looking for a nice set of wheels to cruise on grab a set of Beasts for that smooth ride!

Per Usual, if you have any questions whatsoever, comments, recommendations, hatemail, loveletters…
Hit me up!

Stay Awesome,
Wayne

My Favorite Setups:
-Original Drop Beast
-Paris 195mm
-Purple Nipples
-Bones Reds Bearings
-FIREBALL INCENDOS

-Bustin Ibach
-Surf-Rodz 200mm RKPs
-Venom SHR 86a
-Surf-Rodz Pro-Series 10mm Bearings
-FIREBALL BEASTS

 

Photo Credit: Tyler Pollard

Bangin Bootlegs! — Seismic Bootleg Review

Bangin Bootlegs! — Seismic Bootleg Review

Hello There Adoring Public!

I have been rocking out on a new set of wheels lately thanks to the lovely team over at Seismic Skate Systems. Seismic has been making wheels for a very long time now and in the past year decided to try their hand at a set of slide specific wheels. They came out with two models of  slide wheels; 70mm Bootlegs and 75mm Landslides. I have been enjoying the smaller of the two models, the Bootleg in 84a, and they have been satisfying my freeride desires quite well.

That’s a nice face I’m making… you’re welcome planet earth

Before I get into how these wheels handle on the road I would like to talk about the specifications of Seismic Bootlegs. They are 70mm freeride wheels with a 50mm contact path, which is relatively wide for a freeride specific wheel. Bootlegs also feature rounded lips and a stoneground riding surface so that they can slide cleanly right out the box. They also come in two durometers a soft 80a which are red and a hard 84a which are sky blue. One of my favorite features of the wheels is that they have a centerset bearing seat, which means that you can flip and rotate these wheels to your hearts content. Now enough with the wait… let’s get into how they handle on the road!

 

Commuting

I have really enjoyed commuting on these wheels for several reasons. The first is that 70mm is a great size for pushing around town. 70mm is big enough to roll over most bumps, cracks, and twigs yet not so large that they take a long to get up to speed. In addition the 50mm contact path allows you to carve hard for people and traffic slalom without fishtailing out of control.

Freestyle

Bootlegs were an interesting wheel to freestyle on. They are a little wider than the normal wheel I might try to hit some freestyle tricks on, being wider gives them a little more girth than most 70mm wheels. It took some getting used to but I ended up liking them because even at low speeds I could hit some nice little 180 slides without hardly any effort, which I know is not crucial to everyone, but I happen to really like that ability in a slide wheel.

Downhill

Being a 70mm wheel automatically means that Bootlegs are not going to have the highest top speed among wheels, in fact I would wager that their bigger cousins, the Landslides would have a higher top speed. What Bootlegs can do, very well, is accelerate and hold speed. Having on a 70mm diameter allows these wheels to get up to speed very quickly and having a wide contact path gives them that extra weight to add to their momentum. Basically these wheels like get to fast quickly and stay fast. However, you don’t really want to try and corner while going to fast on these since they are designed to slide, they will do just that.

Freeride

This is where the Bootlegs really shine, freeride. These wheels were born to slide. I would describe their slide pattern as a sugary slide, which basically means they aren’t as hard as an icy wheel would feel under, but not as soft as what I would call a buttery wheel. Sliding the Bootlegs and all their sugary glory is really fun and easy once you get a feel for them. Spinning 180 degrees is no sweat with these bad boys, especially when moving at any significant pace. Holding out longer slides on Bootlegs is great and just as easy. You can actually feel the wheels under you feet, and the first few times I took them sideways all I could think was that “these wheels are about to ice out under me” however they never have. They skirt that point right before icing out very nicely which makes your slides just go for day.

In addition my Bootlegs have stood the test of time pretty well. I have taken them sideways a whole bunch over the past few weeks and they have shown very little signs of wearing. What is more important is that there is no sign of flat spotting, oval-ing, ect…

 

Would I recommend Seismic Bootlegs to my friends??

Why yes, yes I would! I would emphasize that they are not a strict downhill wheel, but that they are great for freeride. You can take every which way on the pavement with ease. The only freeriders I might caution are those who ONLY like buttery slides, because like I said, my Bootlegs were more sugary than buttery. However, if you take the time to get to know and love your Bootlegs they will love right back and help you bring your freeride game up a notch or two.

 

Thanks for reading

As usual anything you want to say to me or ask me… just hit me up!

Wayne

 

My Current Setup:
-Seismic Bootlegs 70mm 84a Blue
-Bustin Boards Ibach
-Surf_Rodz RKP’s or Paris 180mm Trucks
-Orangatang Nipples Soft Orange
-Bones Redz

also here are some more photos:

Twirling Whirling Dervish — Loaded Dervish Sama Review

Twirling Whirling Dervish — Loaded Dervish Sama Review

I would venture a guess that pretty much anyone in the world who loves to longboard has given the Loaded Dervish at least a ride or two. Whether you love or hate the Dervish, no one can deny the monumental impact that this board has had on both the longboarding industry and the development of freestyle longboarding. The Dervish is not just a flagship board in the Loaded line-up; it is honestly a staple in the longboarding revolution.

Read more

Divine Street Slayer Wheel Review

Divine Street Slayer Wheel Review

Review by Nate Dierk:
When we first got these wheels, we were a little apprehensive as neither Wayne nor I had ever ridden Divine wheels before and we had no idea what to expect. The wheels were ready to slide right out of the box, having been stone-ground (like most slide wheels these days). I slapped them on my symmetrical comet voodoo doll and couldn’t have been more pleasantly surprised!  These wheels are the easiest to slide of any I’ve ridden, quickly doubling the lengths of my longest slides.

The wheels are 72mm and the set I’ve been riding are 82a durometer, the harder of the two versions available (the softer is 78a). I’ll also note that I have the black version, as some swear that the dyes in wheels can affect the riding characteristics. The slayers have a 56mm contact patch and lightly beveled edges. The edges are also designed to become harder as they wear, enabling the wheels to maintain consistent slide characteristics throughout their lifetime.

As far as riding the wheels go, they are an absolute dream for drifting and sliding. The amount of effort needed to initiate slides is almost eliminated, creating an extremely smooth transition between riding and sliding. Sliding these wheels cuts a lot less speed than other wheels, allowing you to extend the length of your slides significantly or slide at lower speeds. The slides are also incredibly quiet and I highly recommend them for any other ninja skaters out there. The slayers make corner drifting a lot easier too, as when taking fast turns they drift predictably and controllably. I’d also like to note that these wheels take considerable time to begin coning, and I’ve yet to have to flip them (they’re ALMOST centerset) despite riding them for dozens of slide sessions.

All in all, these wheels are one of the BEST slide wheels I’ve ever ridden. They’re fantastic for downhill freeride as you can reliably slide at high speeds. They also make a great first slide wheel as many of my friends who are learning to slide made great progress on my setup. I wouldn’t recommend these wheels for some boards though, as their primary use is for epic slides. For instance I wouldn’t slap these puppies on my Tan Tien as they’re too heavy for the flip tricks often performed in freestyle riding. Same goes for commute boards, as extra weight is a big turnoff for any boards that you have to frequently carry.

Current Setup:

Comet Voodoo Doll ‘D2′ Symmetrical [36”]
SurfRodz Fixed Axel RKP [50°]
Powell Super Swiss 6 Bearings
Divine Street Slayers [72mm, 82a]

 

Thanks for the Review Nate!

Rolling a Fatty — Loaded Fattail Review

Rolling a Fatty — Loaded Fattail Review

Hello fellow longboard enthusiasts!

Loaded recently sent me a brand new toy to play with, their newest board, the Fattail. The Fattail, as the name might imply to you, has one monster of a tail on it. It is a light, tight, flexy board that just makes you want to shred all around town and then some.

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Beastiality — Original Beast Review

Beastiality — Original Beast Review

For those of you who may or may not have seen, Original released their very own Freeride board a little while back. Actually though, I mispoke, Original didn’t just drop one freeride board, they dropped an entire line of 4 freeride boards. They call them the Beast and that’s because they are indeed animals.

   Although many of you may know this already, I feel it is important to make this point to people newer to the sport, there is a distinct difference between freeride and freestyle. Freestyle longboarding involves lots of flip tricks, manuals, and dancing. FreeRIDE longboarding involves hitting long slides and getting down hills in creative and innovative ways. The boards for either type are very different from one another and the Original line of Beasts are freeride boards.

What does one first notice about a beast? In the case of this board, the first thing I noticed was that it was a super sexy beast. Dropped through, low, sleek black, with big ol’ flared kicktails on either side, and a sick grip job. That is the type of beast I have always wanted to ride. If you have ever known anything about me and my riding style then you would know that I LOVE kicks on a board, so I was super mega excited to take the Beast for a spin.

   However, before getting into how it handles on the roads lets talk the board and its specifications. Original has a line-up of 4 different models of the Beast with two sizes and two styles of concavity. The two size options are a more stable 41in deck or more agile 38in deck. The concavity options are a rocker-concave, better for more tricks, and a W-concave, better for downhill oriented riding.

Board Specifications

Pro’s

Con’s

Length

41in

Kicks

Heavy

Width

10.25in

Symmetry

Grip falls off gas pedals easy

Wheelbase

28in

Gas Pedals

 

Shape

Symmetrical

Waist

Drop-Through

Drop Through

 

Special Features

Gas Pedals

Kicktails

Sweet grip job

 

The Beast 41 Rocker Concave, the one I have been riding, has a nice concave to it, which although is not as extreme as the W-Concave, can still lock your feet in for some downhill action. I felt very comfortable taking my Beast really fast downhill when it had Paris trucks on it, however, once I put a set of Surf_Rodz on the board it was game over. It made it even lower and more stable. I was able to hit some serious downhill runs on this board despite it being the board designed for a more freeride style. I wouldn’t recommend the RockerConcave to win you some races, but it can definitely hold its own going fast.

  Although it can hold serious speed what the board is really meant for is handling loooong slides. This is what the Beast REALLY excels at. Having the concavity to lock your feet in place while gaining speed and then the huge gas pedals with which you wrap your toes or heels around kicked this board’s and my own sliding ability up a couple of notches. My standing slides were drastically lengthened and very controlled when rocking the Beast. I can really just haul down a hill and turn sideways into a slide with 100% confidence and ease. I have really liked freeriding on this board and I think anyone who picks up a Beast will fall in love with its sliding potential.

   Having big old flared kicktails like it does has lent this board to more than just straight freeride. The Beast line is pretty freaking good at freestyle longboarding as well. Like I mentioned above, I LOVE a board with kicktails, I think that having kicktails adds a whole different dimension of skating to your ride. The tails on the Beast are not only prevalent but they are extra-functional. You can hit all your favorite shoves, bigspins, manuals, whatever you’re looking for with these tails. The Beast, being a freeride board, is a tad heavy for super aggressive freestyle, but once you get used to the weight it’s smooth sailing.

   Tails are not only a welcome addition to any board for freestyle but for commuting. You can use these tails to drop off curbs and grab a tigerclaw with the greatest of ease, the hardest part is getting used to lifting the weight of the board up. Being a drop through makes the Beast a lowww rider, which helps make pushing around town all the easier.

   It can’t all be good though. My biggest qualms with the Beast are that it is a heavy board, the grip falls off the gas pedals kind of easily, and the tails chip. Hitting a bunch of freestyle/flippy tricks inevitably means that your board ends up hitting the group upside-down, which pulls the grip off the rails and the chips the tails up a bit. However, I don’t see this as being a big deal because gas pedals don’t necessarily need a bunch of grip on them, all you need is to be able to wrap your foot around them for that extra Umph in your slide.

   All in all the Beast does its name justice!!! It is a freeride machine that can hold its own going fast and hitting up some freestyle time. I have really enjoyed riding this board and I will continue to thrash it for many many days to come. If you’re and intermediate rider who is very interested in freeride but also wants a board that perform well in other disciplines… you might want to get a beast under your feet!

Any questions, comments, concerns, advice…. Hit me up!
Wayne

My Current Set-Up:
-Beast 41 AvRocker
-Surf_Rodz 200mm RKP
-Orangatang Stimulus 80a Wheels
-Bones Reds
-Orangatang Nipple Bushings (Purple)

Ascending to the Apex — Original Skateboards Apex 40 Review

Ascending to the Apex — Original Skateboards Apex 40 Review

   Have you heard the news? The news… the news I’m talking about, the news is that there is a new Sheriff in town in the Original Line-up. That’s right, there is a new Apex hanging around and it goes by the name of the Apex 40.

Let’s get into the technical specifications of the new Apex 40. This may be mildly confusing to some people, especially those newer to the sport, but the Apex 40 comes in two different varieties and it is important to understand the differences. Your two Apex 40 options are the AVRockerConcave and the DoubleConcave, which is the one I have been rocking. The difference between the two boards lie in subtle changes to the platform and kicktails.

The Apex 40 AVRockerConcave is the board devoted more to freestyle and commuting. The AVRockerConcave has taller kicktails than the DoubleConcave board and not as much as much of a drop down. Making it a rockstar for freestyle, hitting those big spin tricks, and taking on some smaller hills. This Apex is constructed with 3 plies of maples and carbon reinforced quad-axial fiberglass making it one tough son of a gun.

Board Specifications AVRockerConcave

Length

40.75in

Width

9.5in

Wheelbase

27.5in or 29in

Shape

Symmetrical, Topmont

Concave

.58in

Special Features

Dual Kicktails, truck mounting options

That was about all I can tell you about the AVRockerConcave because I was actually given the DoubleConcave Apex 40 to review. This board is meant for a little more freeride than freestyle, although either board can do both. The DoubleConcave has a tiny drop platform (a quarter of an inch), gas pedals, and as the name suggests, some nice concavity.

Board Specifications DoubleConcave

Length

40.75in

Width

9.5in

Wheelbase

27.5in or 29in

Shape

Symmetrical, Topmont

Concave

0.55-0.62in

Special Features

Dual Kicktails, truck mounting options, 0.25in Drop Platform, Gas Pedals

The Apex 40 series has a rather unique construction. The boards are very thin for their length with only 3 plies of maple. Seeing how thin they were made me question their sturdiness, however, once you stand on one of them that question is cast from your mind, they are clearly built to last. In addition to the maple the Apex 40 has quadaxial fiberglass and carbon holding everything together. This added a huge amount of durability to the board because carbon fiber is damn near impossible to break. The flex on my Apex 40 is not necessarily bouncey but it can definitely pop you in and out of hard carves and what not, but more importantly I think the flex helps it absorb impact shock. You can bottom out the deck if you really try, but its not super easy.

I was super stoked to take this board out and put it through some runs around town, so I set it up right away with a combination I haven’t beat since then (except a wheel change).
-Surf_Rodz 177mm Indeesz
-Orangatang Stimulus 86a wheels
-Orangatang Nipples Yellow (board side)/Venom SHR Barrel 86a (road side)

The reason I like this set up so much is that Indeesz have a similar geometry and surfy feel to the S-Series trucks that Original produces and design many of their boards around. Although I don’t believe that Original necessarily recommends S-Series trucks for the Apex 40 because it is more of a freeride oriented board I DO think that they obviously consider their own trucks when making boards. Anyways, I just never found a set of reverse kingpin trucks that I felt suited the board as much as the Indeesz, they made the board lower, super pumpy, and really really slidey.

Now lets get down to how the Apex 40 performs in different styles of riding. This bad boy excels in that middle point right between intense freestyle and crazy freeride. Which means that it is super fun on both the flats and on the hills. Its not your typical super heavy stiff downhill deck or your featherweight flexy cruiser.

The Apex 40 is rocking some nice gas pedals, which are rails you can wrap your heel or toe around to get extra torque on slides, and they really add a lot of additional UMPH to your slides both 180s and long standees. The microdrop in the deck locks your feet in a surprising amount for being so little. You feel really confident in your stance when riding in the pockets. However, since the drop and concave are pretty mild holding long glove slides takes some getting used to, but once you figure out the positioning of your feet, it gets kind of awesome. The deck is a little light for a typical freeride deck which, in my opinion, made it much more agile on the hills. Throwing the board around for a slide takes very little effort and even more challenging tricks like slide shovits were smooth on the Apex 40.

Taking the Apex to the flats for some freestyle time is awesome, and possibly my favorite riding aspect of the board. The board is symmetrical with two mounting options for your trucks. I tried both and I very much preferred the inner mounting option for freestyle because it gives you a little more pop off the tails. The apex is a little heavier than the majority of freestyle boards, but what it loses in weight it makes up for in awesomeness. The damp flex makes it so you never bounce off your board, I have taken it off pretty high ledges and didn’t bounce off or bottom out. The concave is mild enough and the platform is long enough for some serious board dancing and the concave actually locks your feet in nicely for peter pans. Flip tricks are also super sick on the Apex 40 because you have so much room to land on your board and you have dual kicks. Kicks are literally the best addition to any freestyle board in my opinion, they have opened a whole new dimension of freestyle riding to longboarding.

Commuting around town on this board is pretty rad. It is not the light bouncy commuter many people think of when a commuting board comes to mind, however, the Apex 40 is sick at getting you from point A to point B. What I liked about it was that you could pop the board into a tigerclaw over a curb and immediately tuck and flew down your every day hill with an equal amount of confidence and ease. Mentioned above the board locks your feet for standies really nicely, which basically means you can add style points to your commute by busting some 180 slides all over the place.

Of course it can’t all be good. I’m going to take a second to talk about some of the weaknesses of the board. The Apex 40 is not a dedicated downhill board, which does not mean it can’t go down hills very fast, it does mean that there are better boards out there for strictly downhill longboarding. Having a lower drop down deck and deeper concave is generally desired for a downhill board. Additionally I think I would have liked to see the tailed dropped a little lower so tricks like ollies, which are better with some serious pop, would be easier on the board.

Would I recommend the Apex 40??? I totally would! Like I mentioned, I wouldn’t recommend to someone trying to win DH races. I think that beginners would really like this board if they rode it too, however, I don’t think that is the demographic of riders who would truly get the most use out of it. I think this board is exceptional in that it hit the perfect middle point between serious freeride and nasty freestyle, so those riders who are good at both and love to switch in between them should consider this board. It will hold those long slides, it will flip around in tricks, and it will stand up to a beating.

Thanks for Reading!
Any comments, questions, concerns, letters of Admiration?
Hit me up!
Wayne

My Current Set-Up:
-Apex 40 DoubleConcave
-Orangatang Balut 72.5mm 83a
-Surf_Rodz 177mm Indeesz
-Bones Reds
-Orangatang Nipples (purple)